Let’s Mode.

Depeche Mode, that is.

Their first non 80s-rooted album was “Songs of Faith and Devotion”. And it’s problem is that it’s DM’S Poland.
Wait. You might need some background on that. There’s this old Polish joke (and one liked by historians world-wide, too), about the Christian god really hating Poland, seating them between Germany and Russia. And should you look into Polands wild and violent history, you will quickly understand that, should there be any kind of god/s? Yeah, they’re playing a damn cruel joke on Poland.

So did Depeche Mode on “Songs of Faith and Devotion”, releasing it between “Violator” and “Ultra”. It… Kinda gets lost easily, even though it spots some killer tracks on its own! Some that are often overlooked. Or, well, simply not played as vividly as “Personal Jesus” and “Barrel of a Gun” and “It’s No Good” and “World in My Eyes” and “Enjoy the Silence” and “Policy of Truth” and… … Well, you get the idea, right?

So, today I’m giving you “Walking in My Shoes”. A deeply sombre track about a sinner trying to explain himself to a captive audience. It’s slow and pondering yet still powerful and gripping.

Another one of my favourite autumn tracks. This time one I love to listen to when I drive to club to dance the night away. And sometimes even when I drive back, with a wistful smile and memories of a great and adventurous night fresh in my mind.

Enjoy.

Depeche Mode – Walking in My Shoes [Songs of Faith and Devotion] | 1993 | New Wave -> Synthpop

[expand title=”Lyrics”]I would tell you about the things
They put me through
The pain I’ve been subjected to
But the Lord himself would blush
The countless feasts laid at my feet
Forbidden fruits for me to eat
But I think your pulse would start to rush

Now I’m not looking for absolution
Forgiveness for the things I do
But before you come to any conclusions
Try walking in my shoes
Try walking in my shoes

You’ll stumble in my footsteps
Keep the same appointments I kept
If you try walking in my shoes
If you try walking in my shoes

Morality would frown upon
Decency look down upon
The scapegoat fate’s made of me
But I promise now, my judge and jurors
My intentions couldn’t have been purer
My case is easy to see

I’m not looking for a clearer conscience
Peace of mind after what I’ve been through
And before we talk of any repentance
Try walking in my shoes
Try walking in my shoes

You’ll stumble in my footsteps
Keep the same appointments I kept
If you try walking in my shoes
If you try walking in my shoes
Try walking in my shoes

Now I’m not looking for absolution
Forgiveness for the things I do
But before you come to any conclusions
Try walking in my shoes
Try walking in my shoes

You’ll stumble in my footsteps
Keep the same appointments I kept
If you try walking in my shoes

You’ll stumble in my footsteps
Keep the same appointments I kept
If you try walking in my shoes
Try walking in my shoes
If you try walking in my shoes
Try walking in my shoes[/expand]



Let’s listen to a voice.

This one has no greater (sub)cultural appeal (at least that I’m aware of!). It’s just a song I really love and which I got as a single back in the days, too, as it’s simply a great tune. I’m also willing to bet some honest money that most of you will also know that tune. Probably not by name, but you either heard it in a movie, on the radio or on TV and it stuck with you. It’s easy to “forget”, but it’s pretty damn hard to “lose”.

So, in a way, I think what I’m going for is to simply make you remember what you were doing when you first heard that song. If you like… Share it with me, please.

So, go ahead. Listen to this track.
Remember. :)

Edwyn Collins – A Girl Like You [Gorgeous George] | 1994 | Indie Pop

What gets me, every time, how much like an archetypical 60s tune this song sounds. I’d kill to hear a version of this song done by Jim Morrison.

As for me…? The memory most associated with this song is a particular moment in 1998, with a very particular and wonderful woman. It was so damn fitting. We danced to it. We kissed to it. We enjoyed a star-lit night to it. It was amazing how much of an emotional impact that song had on us both, even though it was during a random party and we’ve never seen each other before. So, yeah. This is a memory song for me. A good one.

Good night!

Let’s mention music that makes “true fans” descent into rages.

The last two days were about Goth and Pop. Let’s combine this.
What does come out when you combine Goth and Pop in the 90s?

H.I.M.

1997 was a great year to see “True” Goths frenzy like blood-starved vampires at the mere mention of Ville Vallo’s band. And I have to admit that I showed some stupidly reasonless disdain, too. But I got better fast and started enjoying their music with 1999’s “Razorblade Romance“. That album still holds some wonderful tracks that are relevant if you want to set a darkly romantic mood without hunting down some precious, 250-times pressed on vinyl, rare Apocalyptic Folk release. (Yes, such shit makes me angry.)

But I think I’ll try to leave the 1999 albums for December. While they were the distilled essence of the 90s, they didn’t really have any effect ON them. That’s why I have less problems with songs fro, 1990. While they were distilled 80s songs, they had great effect on the 90s. It’s all shades and gradients with me. (Yes, that was an attempt at dry humour. I’m not really that pretentious. … Not all the time, at least.)

So, let me show you some 1997 HIM in a playback situation. Mostly because I couldn’t find the proper music video for this.

HIM – Your Sweet Six Six Six [Greatest Love Songs Vol. 666] | 1997 | Goth-Pop

Looking back, I don’t get what made people so damn angry. I guess it was the rapid and sudden success, and that this bred resentment in fans of other bands. People probably thought that “their” band deserved that money and fame more than H.I.M. did. And with that came the accusations and the slander and the bad, insulting jokes and the ostracism of H.I.M. fans at Goth “functions” (clubs, discos, parties, festivals, bars).

Proxy-jealousy.

Which is paradoxical in many ways, the greatest being: The people mostly opposed to H.I.M.’s success are also the ones who got angry and loud when “their” band DID attain more mainstream success and who then left in droves because those bands weren’t “true” any more.

What drives people to think that the best thing to happen to the bands they love is peemanent obscurity I don’t know. But it’s there in every fandom and every niche. I still remember angry X-Files nerds “quitting the show” when it got mainstream-popular.

I get stopping being a fan of something if the success is due to a change in style and focus (see Unheilig). But most of the time it seems that people just love being able to “love” something that’s obscure and thus keeping some fake sense of elitism alive.